© 2016 by The Delaware County Veterans Memorial Association DCVMA is an IRS 501[c] 3, #20-5041306, not-for-profit corporation and a registered Pennsylvania Charitable Organization.

Delaware County Veterans Memorial  Veterans Education Programs Grades K-12

Among the Delaware County Veterans Memorial Association’s (DCVMA) major initiatives is the Linda M. Houldin Education Fund, named for late Linda M. Houldin, founding member of the DCVMA. The educational endeavors undertaken by the DCVMA focus on educational programs for students in grades K-12.

 

 

 

The study of American history and civics comes to life in age-appropriate curriculum-based programs that meet the core requirements for both subjects as required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Nearly 6,000 students have participated to date from public and parochial schools as well as organizations like Scouts and homeschoolers.

The educational program is unique because it actively engages students in the study of history and civics in grades K-12.  Students learn firsthand about war and the conflicts that are part of the history of the United States.  Historical references, starting with the War of 1812 and continuing to the current conflicts in the Middle East, inform and inspire visitors.  The study of American history and civics comes to life in age-appropriate curriculum-based programs that meet the core requirements for both subjects as required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

On their visit to the Memorial, students are introduced to the design and structure of the monument, highlighting symbols like the eagle and military flags.  Also on-site is a bronze statue of Sergeant “Wild” Bill Guarnere, a U.S. Army World War II veteran and member of the 101st Airborne Division who is featured prominently in the famed book by Stephen Ambrose, Band of Brothers, and TV HBO series of the same name. Guarnere’s son is frequently on hand to speak with students about the heroism celebrated at the Memorial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also at the Memorial, students “adopt” a soldier by making a rubbing of a name inscribed on the granite wall of fallen heroes.

 

Prior to the students’ visit to the Memorial, a veteran can visit the classroom to provide a personal perspective and prepare students for their trip. High school students are encouraged to research their adopted soldier, interview family members, if possible, and develop a written profile that is placed in the Memorial archives.

Students in lower elementary grades sing patriotic songs and create patriotic art and craft projects.  Upper level students learn about the nation’s conflicts on the engravings on the nine pillars. The Civil War pillar features President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the War of 1812 pillar features Francis Scott Key’s national anthem. 

 

 

 

 

                                                   

 

 

Students receive an American flag and copy of the Constitution as they leave the Memorial.  

 

The opportunity to learn about veterans through personal stories and witnessing the sacrifice made by scores of fallen soldiers makes a lasting impression on students and creates civic pride and an abiding interest in history.  The goal to expand the sharing of this resource will instill pride and service to country in future generations.  Donations to the Education Program make this possible

 

 

 

Rev. 3/19

 

 

Linda M. Houldin